Glossary

EHS Compliance

What is EHS Compliance?

EHS (Environmental Health and Safety) compliance is the process of ensuring that a company complies with environmental, health, and safety regulations in its sector. This includes both regulated mandates and voluntary standards.

At its core, EHS compliance is all about a business safeguarding both the environment and the health and safety of its workers. EHS compliance covers topics like air quality, water quality, waste management, hazardous materials handling, workplace safety, and more. The goal of EHS compliance is to ensure a safe working environment and world.

EHS compliance programs vary by industry but have some commonalities between them. They typically identify, monitor, and address potential risks and hazards. This can include employee training, audits, inspections, and leveraging technology to track and continuously monitor EHS data.

EHS Compliance

History of EHS Compliance

The single-minded focus on corporate and economic growth that characterized the last few decades has had steep costs for safety and the environment. Pollution, climate change, and resource depletion compelled governments and organizations to standardize environmental, health, and safety best practices. 

EHS compliance does not hinder corporate growth. It supports business expansion by  implementing sustainable business processes that make the workplace and the larger environment safe. 

Environmental, Health, and Safety Issues That Apply to Most Businesses

  • Environmental
  • Air emissions
  • Energy conservation
  • Water conservation
  • Hazardous waste management
  • Contamination
  • Health and safety
  • Water quality
  • Structural safety
  • Fire safety
  • Disease prevention
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Physical occupational hazards
  • Chemical hazards

Which Laws and Regulations are Included in EHS Compliance?

EHS compliance covers a wide range of laws and regulations that vary depending on the industry, location, and specific activities of the organization. Some examples of laws and regulations that may be included in EHS compliance are:

  1. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

These regulations set safety standards for workplaces and require employers to provide a safe working environment for employees.

  1. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

These regulations are aimed at protecting the environment and include laws related to air quality, water quality, waste management, and hazardous materials handling.

  1. Hazardous Waste Regulations

These regulations require the proper handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous waste materials.

  1. Clean Air Act (CAA) and Clean Water Act (CWA)

These laws regulate air and water pollution and establish guidelines for emissions and effluent limits.

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  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 

This law regulates the management of hazardous waste from “cradle-to-grave,” including generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal.

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) 

This law regulates the manufacture, import, processing, and distribution of chemical substances in the United States.

  1. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA)

This law requires companies to report hazardous substances released into the environment and develop emergency response plans in case of accidental release.

What’s the Difference between ESG Compliance and EHS Compliance?

ESG compliance and EHS compliance are related but different concepts.

EHS compliance focuses on environmental, health, and safety regulations and standards, and the goal is to ensure that an organization operates in a way that minimizes harm to the environment and protects the health and safety of employees, customers, and other stakeholders.

ESG compliance, on the other hand, refers to an organization’s adherence to environmental, social, and governance principles, which are increasingly seen as important factors for investors, customers, and other stakeholders. ESG principles go beyond EHS compliance and also encompass social and governance issues, such as labor practices, diversity and inclusion, community relations, and ethical business practices.

While EHS compliance is primarily concerned with minimizing risk and complying with regulations, ESG compliance is more focused on demonstrating a commitment to sustainability, social responsibility, and good governance practices. An organization that is ESG compliant may also be EHS compliant, but the reverse is not necessarily true.

To sum it up, while EHS compliance focuses on minimizing harm to the environment and protecting human health and safety, ESG compliance encompasses a broader range of issues related to sustainability, social responsibility, and good governance.

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system does and eliminates the need for manual processes and spreadsheets
to give you immediate value and run a full risk assessment in less than 30 days

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